Scenario and cost benefit analysis of proposed policy options for the supply of legal timber to the domestic market

Authors:
Gene Birikorang, Emmanuel Marfo, Kyere Boateng and Beatrice Obiri-Darko

Under the VPA with the European Union, Ghana has made a commitment to ensure that legal timber is not only traded on the export market but on the domestic market as well. Therefore, Ghana is seriously looking for options for supplying legal timber to the domestic market. The EU is supporting the Government through the NREG Programme and a Tropenbos International Ghana led project to develop alternatives to illegal chainsaw milling through a multi-stakeholder dialogue process backed by scientific research. These initiatives have developed the following three policy directions as a first step towards formulating specific strategic options for dealing with the problem:

Supply of chainsaw lumber to the domestic market: Preliminary results from a validation study

Authors:
Francis Wilson Owusu, Lawrence Damnyag, Emmanuel Marfo and Gertrude Boateng Nantwi


This report was produced within the framework of the EU Chainsaw Milling Project “Supporting the integration of legal and legitimate domestic timber markets into Voluntary Partnership Agreements”. The project aims to find sustainable solutions to the problems associated with the production of lumber for local timber markets by involving all stakeholders in dialogue, information gathering and the development of alternatives to unsustainable chainsaw milling practices. In Ghana, the project is being carried out by Tropenbos International (TBI) in collaboration with the Forestry Research Institute of Ghana (FORIG) and the Forestry Commission (FC).

Chainsaw Operators, Alternative livelihood options and climate change mitigation

Authors:
Acheampong, Emmanuel Marfo and Shalom Addo-Danso

This study sought to assess the preferences of chainsaw dependent communities for forest- based alternative livelihood interventions that also have potential for climate change mitigation. In particular, the study attempted to answer the following research questions:

What forest-based interventions have the potential to support both rural livelihoods and climate change mitigation efforts simultaneously?
What are the specific preferences of chainsaw operatives for such interventions and the reasons behind their preferences?

Development assistance in the forestry sector

Impacts over the last two decades and implications for the future

Authors:
Chris Beeko, Kwame Antwi Oduro, Elizabeth Asantewaa Obeng

 This study was commissioned under the Growing Forest Partnerships initiative in Ghana. The purpose of the study was to provide inputs that can challenge and influence the direction and quality of development assistance in the forest sector in such a manner as to return optimum contribution to the governance environment, growth of institutions, and the development of the resource. The forest sector of Ghana can be credited for the role it has played in the country’s economic development. Currently, the sector contributes four percent to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Over the last two decades, there have been several efforts from development partners to assist the sector improve on its contribution to national socio-economic development. Consequently, the sector has consistently received millions of dollars of development assistance from various development partners. In the past two decades, an amount in excess of US$ 643 million (in 2009 dollar value) has been pumped into the sector. This gives an average, between 1989-2009, of US$ 32 million a year (in 2009 dollar value). The forest sector aid architecture in Ghana has changed over the years.

Technologies for Forest Management, Utilization and Development

Compiled by:
Stella B. Acquah, Sarah Pentsil, Naomi Appiah, William K. Dumenu and Bukari Daramani

Handbook

Over the years, CSIR-FORIG has developed a number of technologies and interventions through research. Technology here refers to ‘any specific information and know-how, tangible or intangible, required to solve a problem or for the development, production, management or use of resources (Wikipedia, 2012, UNESCO, 1985). Th e technologies generated at CSIR-FORIG are aimed at combating environmental degradation, safeguarding the sustainable use of the nation’s forest resources and improving rural livelihood. All these technologies have the potential to contribute positively to the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of Ghanaians. However, many of the technologies have not been properly packaged, publicised and transferred to target stakeholders, users and the general public in comprehensible language.

Who We Are

Forestry Research Institute of Ghana is one of the 13 institutes of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). It is located at Fumesua near Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. It started as a research unit within the Forestry Department in 1962. It was fully established as a research institute and named FOREST PRODUCTS RESEARCH INSTITUTE (FPRI) under the then Ghana Academy of Sciences in 1964 and in 1968 placed under the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR).

Contact Us

The Director
Forestry Research Institute of Ghana, P. O. Box UP 63 KNUST
Kumasi, Ghana

Tel :+233-(0)3220-60123/60373
Fax :+233-(0)3220-60121
Email : [email protected]