Advancing REDD+ in Ghana: Preparation of REDD+ Pilot Schemes in Off-Reserve Forests and Agroforests

Project Team:
Oduro, K.A., Agyeman, V.K., Foli, E. & Damnyag, L.

Background
Th is project is preparing a major support component to Ghana’s Readiness Preparation Proposal (RPP) and aims at strengthening Ghana’s capacities to prevent and reduce deforestation and forest degradation and enhance carbon stocks (REDD+). It lays out the ground work for the development or enhancement of off -reserve production systems under REDD+ schemes, in line with e ort to reduce GHG emissions in forests. Th e present REDDES project is a preparatory step for an additional support component for the implementation of Ghana’s R-PP and is mainly concerned with developing a number of analytical works and the de finition of REDD+ pilots in off -reserve areas. Th e project

Advancing REDD+ in Ghana: Preparation of REDD+ Pilot Schemes in Off-Reserve Forests and Agroforests

Project Team:
Oduro, K.A., Agyeman, V.K., Foli, E. & Damnyag, L.

Background
Th is project is preparing a major support component to Ghana’s Readiness Preparation Proposal (RPP) and aims at strengthening Ghana’s capacities to prevent and reduce deforestation and forest degradation and enhance carbon stocks (REDD+). It lays out the ground work for the development or enhancement of off -reserve production systems under REDD+ schemes, in line with e ort to reduce GHG emissions in forests. Th e present REDDES project is a preparatory step for an additional support component for the implementation of Ghana’s R-PP and is mainly concerned with developing a number of analytical works and the de finition of REDD+ pilots in off -reserve areas. Th e project

Allanblackia: Standard Setting and Sustainable Supply Chain Management (Phase II)

Project Team:
Anglaaere, L.C.N., Blay, D., Damnyag, L., Dabo, J., Owusu, S. and Manu, E.

Background
Th is project, which is sponsored by the Swiss Economic Cooperation Organization (SECO), is a continuation of a fi rst phase that focused on establishing biological baselines for Allanblackia (AB) within five communities in the Western Region. It involved an assessment of phenology of species (flowering, fruiting, fruit size and number of seeds per pod), regeneration and growth rates of the Allanblackia tree on farms and in the forest. Following a successful completion of this phase, a proposal was made for a second phase to move the AB programme forward and to, among other things, increase population of AB within the landscape. Th e project was consequently up-scaled to cover 8 communities in the Western Region.

Allanblackia: Standard Setting and Sustainable Supply Chain Management (Phase II)

Project Team:
Anglaaere, L.C.N., Blay, D., Damnyag, L., Dabo, J., Owusu, S. and Manu, E.

Background
Th is project, which is sponsored by the Swiss Economic Cooperation Organization (SECO), is a continuation of a fi rst phase that focused on establishing biological baselines for Allanblackia (AB) within five communities in the Western Region. It involved an assessment of phenology of species (flowering, fruiting, fruit size and number of seeds per pod), regeneration and growth rates of the Allanblackia tree on farms and in the forest. Following a successful completion of this phase, a proposal was made for a second phase to move the AB programme forward and to, among other things, increase population of AB within the landscape. Th e project was consequently up-scaled to cover 8 communities in the Western Region.

Allanblackia: Standard Setting and Sustainable Supply Chain Management (Phase II)

Project Team:
Anglaaere, L.C.N., Blay, D., Damnyag, L., Dabo, J., Owusu, S. and Manu, E.

Background
Th is project, which is sponsored by the Swiss Economic Cooperation Organization (SECO), is a continuation of a fi rst phase that focused on establishing biological baselines for Allanblackia (AB) within five communities in the Western Region. It involved an assessment of phenology of species (flowering, fruiting, fruit size and number of seeds per pod), regeneration and growth rates of the Allanblackia tree on farms and in the forest. Following a successful completion of this phase, a proposal was made for a second phase to move the AB programme forward and to, among other things, increase population of AB within the landscape. Th e project was consequently up-scaled to cover 8 communities in the Western Region.

Allanblackia: Standard Setting and Sustainable Supply Chain Management (Phase II)

Project Team:
Anglaaere, L.C.N., Blay, D., Damnyag, L., Dabo, J., Owusu, S. and Manu, E.

Background
Th is project, which is sponsored by the Swiss Economic Cooperation Organization (SECO), is a continuation of a fi rst phase that focused on establishing biological baselines for Allanblackia (AB) within five communities in the Western Region. It involved an assessment of phenology of species (flowering, fruiting, fruit size and number of seeds per pod), regeneration and growth rates of the Allanblackia tree on farms and in the forest. Following a successful completion of this phase, a proposal was made for a second phase to move the AB programme forward and to, among other things, increase population of AB within the landscape. Th e project was consequently up-scaled to cover 8 communities in the Western Region.

Does shifting Carbon Use Efficiency determine the Growth Rates of intact and disturbed Tropical Forests? Gathering new evidence from African forests

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S., Owusu-Afriyie, K., Duah-Gyamfi , A., Addo-Danso, S.D., Djagbletey,G.D., Amponsah Manu, E. and Adu-Opoku, A.

Collaborators:
School of Geography and the Environment, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

Background
Tropical forests play a major role in the global carbon cycle, by storing a substantial amount of carbon in biomass and soil, and by regulating transfer of this stored carbon into the atmosphere as greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2).

Does shifting Carbon Use Efficiency determine the Growth Rates of intact and disturbed Tropical Forests? Gathering new evidence from African forests

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S., Owusu-Afriyie, K., Duah-Gyamfi , A., Addo-Danso, S.D., Djagbletey,G.D., Amponsah Manu, E. and Adu-Opoku, A.

Collaborators:
School of Geography and the Environment, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

Background
Tropical forests play a major role in the global carbon cycle, by storing a substantial amount of carbon in biomass and soil, and by regulating transfer of this stored carbon into the atmosphere as greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2).

Does shifting Carbon Use Efficiency determine the Growth Rates of intact and disturbed Tropical Forests? Gathering new evidence from African forests

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S., Owusu-Afriyie, K., Duah-Gyamfi , A., Addo-Danso, S.D., Djagbletey,G.D., Amponsah Manu, E. and Adu-Opoku, A.

Collaborators:
School of Geography and the Environment, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

Background
Tropical forests play a major role in the global carbon cycle, by storing a substantial amount of carbon in biomass and soil, and by regulating transfer of this stored carbon into the atmosphere as greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2).

Does shifting Carbon Use Efficiency determine the Growth Rates of intact and disturbed Tropical Forests? Gathering new evidence from African forests

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S., Owusu-Afriyie, K., Duah-Gyamfi , A., Addo-Danso, S.D., Djagbletey,G.D., Amponsah Manu, E. and Adu-Opoku, A.

Collaborators:
School of Geography and the Environment, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

Background
Tropical forests play a major role in the global carbon cycle, by storing a substantial amount of carbon in biomass and soil, and by regulating transfer of this stored carbon into the atmosphere as greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2).

Savanna Forest Boundary Transition in West Africa –Coupling the Energy Balance and Hydrology and Carbon Cycles across the Biome zot

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S. and Ametsitsi, G.K.D.

Collaborators:
Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology Group, Wageningen University

Background
GEOCARBON is an European FP7 project with a global perspective, with the ultimate aim to lay the foundations for an operational Global Carbon Observing and Analysis System in support to both science and policy. Th e loss of most transitional forest over a distance of 150 km nationwide (“savanisation”) particularly in the zone of transition (ZOT) in Ghana has been dramatic.

Savanna Forest Boundary Transition in West Africa –Coupling the Energy Balance and Hydrology and Carbon Cycles across the Biome zot

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S. and Ametsitsi, G.K.D.

Collaborators:
Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology Group, Wageningen University

Background
GEOCARBON is an European FP7 project with a global perspective, with the ultimate aim to lay the foundations for an operational Global Carbon Observing and Analysis System in support to both science and policy. Th e loss of most transitional forest over a distance of 150 km nationwide (“savanisation”) particularly in the zone of transition (ZOT) in Ghana has been dramatic.

Savanna Forest Boundary Transition in West Africa –Coupling the Energy Balance and Hydrology and Carbon Cycles across the Biome zot

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S. and Ametsitsi, G.K.D.

Collaborators:
Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology Group, Wageningen University

Background
GEOCARBON is an European FP7 project with a global perspective, with the ultimate aim to lay the foundations for an operational Global Carbon Observing and Analysis System in support to both science and policy. Th e loss of most transitional forest over a distance of 150 km nationwide (“savanisation”) particularly in the zone of transition (ZOT) in Ghana has been dramatic.

Savanna Forest Boundary Transition in West Africa –Coupling the Energy Balance and Hydrology and Carbon Cycles across the Biome zot

Project Team:
Adu-Bredu, S. and Ametsitsi, G.K.D.

Collaborators:
Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology Group, Wageningen University

Background
GEOCARBON is an European FP7 project with a global perspective, with the ultimate aim to lay the foundations for an operational Global Carbon Observing and Analysis System in support to both science and policy. Th e loss of most transitional forest over a distance of 150 km nationwide (“savanisation”) particularly in the zone of transition (ZOT) in Ghana has been dramatic.

Who We Are

Forestry Research Institute of Ghana is one of the 13 institutes of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). It is located at Fumesua near Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. It started as a research unit within the Forestry Department in 1962. It was fully established as a research institute and named FOREST PRODUCTS RESEARCH INSTITUTE (FPRI) under the then Ghana Academy of Sciences in 1964 and in 1968 placed under the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR).

Contact Us

The Director
Forestry Research Institute of Ghana, P. O. Box UP 63 KNUST
Kumasi, Ghana

Tel :+233-(0)3220-60123/60373
Fax :+233-(0)3220-60121
Email : [email protected]