Management of forests established through rehabilitation of degraded forests by local communities in Ghana

Project Team:  
D. Blay, L.Damnyag,  L. Anglaere, Twum Ampofo, F. Dwomoh, Local community reps
Project Duration: 2012-2015

Background
Continuous DFD both in and outside forest reserves  in Ghana has negative impact on local livelihood and the environment. The negative impacts are: Shortage of forest resources; Climate change effects; Loss of biodiversity; Phase I rehabilitated some of degraded forest areas with forest fringe communities collaboration. Local communities established 240 ha of plantations  in some degraded forest reserves. With new benefit-sharing farmers who planted the trees and land owners are entitled to 40%.

Management of forests established through rehabilitation of degraded forests by local communities in Ghana

Project Team:  
D. Blay, L.Damnyag,  L. Anglaere, Twum Ampofo, F. Dwomoh, Local community reps
Project Duration: 2012-2015

Background
Continuous DFD both in and outside forest reserves  in Ghana has negative impact on local livelihood and the environment. The negative impacts are: Shortage of forest resources; Climate change effects; Loss of biodiversity; Phase I rehabilitated some of degraded forest areas with forest fringe communities collaboration. Local communities established 240 ha of plantations  in some degraded forest reserves. With new benefit-sharing farmers who planted the trees and land owners are entitled to 40%.

Biodiversity in Dry Semi-Deciduous Forest Zone: Comparison between Natural Forest, Cleared Forest and Teak Plantations in Ghana

Project Team:
Kankam, B.O., Opuni-Frimpong, E., Ofori-Boateng, C.A., Duah-Gyamfi , A. and Mensah, J.K.

Background
Th e continuous loss of forest cover over the years and its consequent devastating effect on global environmental conditions necessitated the use of planted forests worldwide. In 2007, it was estimated that 121,127 hectares of plantations mainly from exotic species such as teak, cedrela, Gmelina, pines and eucalyptus had already been established in Ghana. However, the extent to which these plantations support biodiversity is unknown. Plantation may a ffect biodiversity either positively or negatively yet, we do not know how different wildlife may respond to di fferent plantation types (especially  teak as pursued in this research). Given that many forest organisms depend on old-growth microhabitats, there is a priori reason to expect differences in relative abundance and diversity of species (e.g. amphibians, butterflies, macrofungi) in natural forests and plantations.

Biodiversity in Dry Semi-Deciduous Forest Zone: Comparison between Natural Forest, Cleared Forest and Teak Plantations in Ghana

Project Team:
Kankam, B.O., Opuni-Frimpong, E., Ofori-Boateng, C.A., Duah-Gyamfi , A. and Mensah, J.K.

Background
Th e continuous loss of forest cover over the years and its consequent devastating effect on global environmental conditions necessitated the use of planted forests worldwide. In 2007, it was estimated that 121,127 hectares of plantations mainly from exotic species such as teak, cedrela, Gmelina, pines and eucalyptus had already been established in Ghana. However, the extent to which these plantations support biodiversity is unknown. Plantation may a ffect biodiversity either positively or negatively yet, we do not know how different wildlife may respond to di fferent plantation types (especially  teak as pursued in this research). Given that many forest organisms depend on old-growth microhabitats, there is a priori reason to expect differences in relative abundance and diversity of species (e.g. amphibians, butterflies, macrofungi) in natural forests and plantations.

Biodiversity in Dry Semi-Deciduous Forest Zone: Comparison between Natural Forest, Cleared Forest and Teak Plantations in Ghana

Project Team:
Kankam, B.O., Opuni-Frimpong, E., Ofori-Boateng, C.A., Duah-Gyamfi , A. and Mensah, J.K.

Background
Th e continuous loss of forest cover over the years and its consequent devastating effect on global environmental conditions necessitated the use of planted forests worldwide. In 2007, it was estimated that 121,127 hectares of plantations mainly from exotic species such as teak, cedrela, Gmelina, pines and eucalyptus had already been established in Ghana. However, the extent to which these plantations support biodiversity is unknown. Plantation may a ffect biodiversity either positively or negatively yet, we do not know how different wildlife may respond to di fferent plantation types (especially  teak as pursued in this research). Given that many forest organisms depend on old-growth microhabitats, there is a priori reason to expect differences in relative abundance and diversity of species (e.g. amphibians, butterflies, macrofungi) in natural forests and plantations.

Biodiversity in Dry Semi-Deciduous Forest Zone: Comparison between Natural Forest, Cleared Forest and Teak Plantations in Ghana

Project Team:
Kankam, B.O., Opuni-Frimpong, E., Ofori-Boateng, C.A., Duah-Gyamfi , A. and Mensah, J.K.

Background
Th e continuous loss of forest cover over the years and its consequent devastating effect on global environmental conditions necessitated the use of planted forests worldwide. In 2007, it was estimated that 121,127 hectares of plantations mainly from exotic species such as teak, cedrela, Gmelina, pines and eucalyptus had already been established in Ghana. However, the extent to which these plantations support biodiversity is unknown. Plantation may a ffect biodiversity either positively or negatively yet, we do not know how different wildlife may respond to di fferent plantation types (especially  teak as pursued in this research). Given that many forest organisms depend on old-growth microhabitats, there is a priori reason to expect differences in relative abundance and diversity of species (e.g. amphibians, butterflies, macrofungi) in natural forests and plantations.

Plants and Soil Microbial response to Herbicides during Plantation establishment in Ghana

Project Team:
Apetorgbor, M.M., Peprah, T., Mensah,J.K., Duah-Gyam fi, A. and Darko-Obiri, B.

Background
Several hectares of plantations are being established in Ghana to reforest degraded forest lands for the past two decades. During the initial establishments of these plantations, diff erent herbicides are used by farmers to selectively remove or kill non-economic plant species, which often compete with the tree saplings for light, water, space and nutrients. Th e continual use of these herbicides depletes populations of ecologically important soil micro-organisms and causes loss of soil fertility. Th e herbicides also alter soil properties, such as pH, which in turn inhibits essential microbial activity.

Plants and Soil Microbial response to Herbicides during Plantation establishment in Ghana

Project Team:
Apetorgbor, M.M., Peprah, T., Mensah,J.K., Duah-Gyam fi, A. and Darko-Obiri, B.

Background
Several hectares of plantations are being established in Ghana to reforest degraded forest lands for the past two decades. During the initial establishments of these plantations, diff erent herbicides are used by farmers to selectively remove or kill non-economic plant species, which often compete with the tree saplings for light, water, space and nutrients. Th e continual use of these herbicides depletes populations of ecologically important soil micro-organisms and causes loss of soil fertility. Th e herbicides also alter soil properties, such as pH, which in turn inhibits essential microbial activity.

Plants and Soil Microbial response to Herbicides during Plantation establishment in Ghana

Project Team:
Apetorgbor, M.M., Peprah, T., Mensah,J.K., Duah-Gyam fi, A. and Darko-Obiri, B.

Background
Several hectares of plantations are being established in Ghana to reforest degraded forest lands for the past two decades. During the initial establishments of these plantations, diff erent herbicides are used by farmers to selectively remove or kill non-economic plant species, which often compete with the tree saplings for light, water, space and nutrients. Th e continual use of these herbicides depletes populations of ecologically important soil micro-organisms and causes loss of soil fertility. Th e herbicides also alter soil properties, such as pH, which in turn inhibits essential microbial activity.

Plants and Soil Microbial response to Herbicides during Plantation establishment in Ghana

Project Team:
Apetorgbor, M.M., Peprah, T., Mensah,J.K., Duah-Gyam fi, A. and Darko-Obiri, B.

Background
Several hectares of plantations are being established in Ghana to reforest degraded forest lands for the past two decades. During the initial establishments of these plantations, diff erent herbicides are used by farmers to selectively remove or kill non-economic plant species, which often compete with the tree saplings for light, water, space and nutrients. Th e continual use of these herbicides depletes populations of ecologically important soil micro-organisms and causes loss of soil fertility. Th e herbicides also alter soil properties, such as pH, which in turn inhibits essential microbial activity.

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services from Remnant Forest/Sacred Groves: The Case of Tano Sacred Grove

Project Team:
Bosu, P.P., Djagbletey, G., Ametsitsi, G.,Addo-Danso, S., Foli, E.G. and Cobbinah, J.R.

Background
Sacred groves are small areas of intact or slightly degraded primary forests reserved for religious and traditional rites. Th ese forest islands remain among the most valuable biodiversity hotspots for which much could be obtained for the conservation and sustainable management of forests for the future. e focal objectives of the study were to:
1. Assess the potential of the Tano Sacred Grove (TSG) to provide the ecosystem service of pollination to the surrounding agricultural landscape.
2. Determine soil nutrients and carbon stocks in the TSG and the various land-use types.

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services from Remnant Forest/Sacred Groves: The Case of Tano Sacred Grove

Project Team:
Bosu, P.P., Djagbletey, G., Ametsitsi, G.,Addo-Danso, S., Foli, E.G. and Cobbinah, J.R.

Background
Sacred groves are small areas of intact or slightly degraded primary forests reserved for religious and traditional rites. Th ese forest islands remain among the most valuable biodiversity hotspots for which much could be obtained for the conservation and sustainable management of forests for the future. e focal objectives of the study were to:
1. Assess the potential of the Tano Sacred Grove (TSG) to provide the ecosystem service of pollination to the surrounding agricultural landscape.
2. Determine soil nutrients and carbon stocks in the TSG and the various land-use types.

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services from Remnant Forest/Sacred Groves: The Case of Tano Sacred Grove

Project Team:
Bosu, P.P., Djagbletey, G., Ametsitsi, G.,Addo-Danso, S., Foli, E.G. and Cobbinah, J.R.

Background
Sacred groves are small areas of intact or slightly degraded primary forests reserved for religious and traditional rites. Th ese forest islands remain among the most valuable biodiversity hotspots for which much could be obtained for the conservation and sustainable management of forests for the future. e focal objectives of the study were to:
1. Assess the potential of the Tano Sacred Grove (TSG) to provide the ecosystem service of pollination to the surrounding agricultural landscape.
2. Determine soil nutrients and carbon stocks in the TSG and the various land-use types.

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services from Remnant Forest/Sacred Groves: The Case of Tano Sacred Grove

Project Team:
Bosu, P.P., Djagbletey, G., Ametsitsi, G.,Addo-Danso, S., Foli, E.G. and Cobbinah, J.R.

Background
Sacred groves are small areas of intact or slightly degraded primary forests reserved for religious and traditional rites. Th ese forest islands remain among the most valuable biodiversity hotspots for which much could be obtained for the conservation and sustainable management of forests for the future. e focal objectives of the study were to:
1. Assess the potential of the Tano Sacred Grove (TSG) to provide the ecosystem service of pollination to the surrounding agricultural landscape.
2. Determine soil nutrients and carbon stocks in the TSG and the various land-use types.

Who We Are

Forestry Research Institute of Ghana is one of the 13 institutes of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). It is located at Fumesua near Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. It started as a research unit within the Forestry Department in 1962. It was fully established as a research institute and named FOREST PRODUCTS RESEARCH INSTITUTE (FPRI) under the then Ghana Academy of Sciences in 1964 and in 1968 placed under the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR).

Contact Us

The Director
Forestry Research Institute of Ghana, P. O. Box UP 63 KNUST
Kumasi, Ghana

Tel :+233-(0)3220-60123/60373
Fax :+233-(0)3220-60121
Email : [email protected]